Tuesday 9 p.m. sportscast

SOME OF THE area's top CORNHOLE PLAYERS MADE THEIR WAY TO THE RUSHMORE MALL LAST WEEKEND FOR THE WEST RIVER CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT. TOP FINISHERS TOOK HOME CASH AND PRIZES. Vic Quick headed out to the mall for more ...

THE SPORT OF CORN HOLE IS GROWING IN POPULARITY ACROSS THE REGION. THE FIRST PLAYER OR TANDEM TO REACH 21 POINTS IS CROWNED THE WINNER.

BUNNIE WILLIAMS "The object of the game is you throw four bags and you score by how they land on the board. If it lands on the board it counts for one point, if it goes in the hole it counts for 3 points and you cancel out each others scores."

RODNEY MASS "It is pretty much a muscle memory sport, but there's some coordination that goes along with it. And it's like golf you can be really good one day and the next day you come out and it's like wow I forgot how to play. That makes it challenging." CORNHOLE ISN'T JUST AS SIMPLE AS TRYING TO THROW THE BAG INTO THE HOLE, AS THERE ARE VARIOUS STRATEGIES THE PLAYERS CAN IMPLEMENT. BUNNIE WILLIAMS "They'll throw it as close as they can get to right in front of the hole and that's called a blocker, so now they have blocked you from getting your bag into the hole, and now they are in a really good spot because the other team trying to get it in could accidentally push yours in."

RODNEY MASS "Some players use cornhole bags that are fairly sticky so they may come up short of the hole. In general if you want to get your bag into the hole for the 3 point shot you have to slide it into the hole. It's very difficult to airmail it directly into the hole." CORNHOLE IS A SPORT THAT JUST ABOUT ANYONE CAN PLAY. AND RODNEY RECOMMENDS THOSE WHO ARE INTERESTED TO GIVE IT A TRY. RODNEY MASS "Anyone can do it pretty much and when you start out it's pretty challenging.And it's easy to improve early on but then it gets more challenging, but when you see how well some of the players can play it's just tremendous incentive to keep at it and to keep trying to improve."

Fans of high school basketball in the area were undoubtedly heartbroken with the news that the South Dakota state tournaments at all levels were postponed ... and likely canceled ... due to the coronavirus pandemic ...

But for these days of social distancing, there's a brand new book out that should scratch at least a bit of the hoops itch for some ... as Wade Davies, a University of Montana Native American Studies professor has released his latest book, Native Hoops: The Rise of American Indian Basketball, 1895-1970 ... and it is exclusively on sale at Prairie Edge in Rapid City or online ...

Comeau said, "It's a wonderful book, he doesn't cover just the basketball he covers what was happening during this time and how was it influenced and where did the influence come from ... a lot of the superintendents wanted the staff members and the students to cover and take care of the team and the traveling teams because they just didn't have the time. So it was full native from coaches, to the players to the ballhandlers to the bus drivers."

The book sells for $24.95 and while I have not finished it, I have begun and it is an absolute treasure trove of information for fans of the game and anyone interested in its history and place within the Native American culture. It's a must-have for any basketball fan from this region's library.

In some women's college basketball news, the University of South Dakota ranked 17th in the final Associated Press Top 25 Poll of the season released today. The Coyotes were 30-2 on the year and ended the season on a 19-game winning streak. Their only two losses were to No. 1-ranked South Carolina on the road and to fellow Top 25 team Missouri State at home. The ranking marked South Dakota's 12th week in the AP Poll, extending the Summit League record for the most weeks in the poll in a single season. In the final USA Today Coaches Poll announced yesterday, the Coyote women ended the season ranked No. 11 by the coaches. It was the highest that any Summit League team has ranked in either national poll.