Supreme Court: Ginsburg treated for tumor on pancreas

By  | 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said in a statement Friday that a routine blood test led to the detection of Ginsburg's tumor. A biopsy performed July 31 confirmed a "localized malignant tumor," and Ginsburg started outpatient radiation therapy Aug. 5. Ginsburg underwent three weeks of radiation therapy and as part of her treatment had a bile duct stent placed, the court said. Ginsburg "tolerated treatment well" and does not need any additional treatment but will continue to have periodic blood tests and scans, the statement said.

Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks about her work and gender equality during a panel discussion at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, Tuesday, July 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The tumor was "treated definitively and there is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body," the court said.

The statement did not say if the new tumor is a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer Ginsburg was diagnosed with in 2009, or a new cancer that arose. She was also treated for colorectal cancer in 1999.

"It's certainly not unheard of for the cancer to come back," but it's a more dire situation if it's that rather than a new tumor that was found early enough for effective treatment, said Dr. Michael Pishvaian, a pancreatic specialist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center who had no first-hand knowledge of Ginsburg's care.

Pancreatic tumors are usually treated with surgery, but she or her doctors may have chosen not to do that for various reasons, and radiation is a standard treatment if surgery is not done, Pishvaian said.

Dr. Alan Venook, a University of California, San Francisco, pancreatic cancer specialist who also has no direct knowledge of Ginsburg's case, said it's not possible to know much about her outlook without details from her doctors.

If it is a recurrence that took a decade to form, "that tells me it's not a very aggressive cancer," he said. If the cancer is truly limited to the pancreas, "it could have been managed perfectly well with radiation," he said.

The court said Ginsburg canceled an annual summer visit to Santa Fe but otherwise maintained an active schedule during treatment. She is scheduled to speak in Buffalo next week and at the Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington at the end of the month.

Before Friday's announcement, Ginsburg's most recent known health scare was in December, when she had surgery for lung cancer. The cancerous growths were found when Ginsburg underwent medical tests after she fell in her court office and broke three ribs in November. Ginsburg was absent from the court in January as she recovered from surgery and missed six days on which the court heard a total of 11 arguments. But she returned to the bench in February, and participated in the court's work during her absence.

___

Chief Medical Writer Marilynn Marchione reported from Milwaukee.

Copyright 2019 Associated Press. All rights reserved.



 
Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station. powered by Disqus