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Fighting for spring school activties

School Classroom
School Classroom(WHSV)
Published: Mar. 19, 2021 at 6:02 PM MDT
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RAPID CITY, S.D. (KEVN) - Education is important, corona virus or not.

Regardless, it’s true that COVID-19 introduced a new reality for students around the globe. The reality is spring semester is nearing its end and students are left missing out on experiences.

Vaccinations are vital when it comes to large groups and those experiences. Where the state isn’t vaccinating students yet, Oyate Health operates on the federal level with a different set of rules.

Katy Urban, the RCAS Public Information Manager, is excited about the opportunities that could potentially arise.

“We just learned this week that Oyate Health is offering vaccinations to our students ages 16 to 18, so that’s kind of a gamechanger for us,” said Urban.

Oyate Health’s obligations lie within the Native American population, but the Health Center has worked diligently for its original recipients and has a remaining supply of vaccines, and a choice of where to place their efforts.

The Communications and Public Relations Director for Oyate Health Center, Brandon Ecoffey, knows that starting the vaccination of these teens was the obvious choice.

Ecoffey says, “We have quite a bit of those vaccines and it’s important to us that the students needed those vaccines to do some of the things in the spring, and we thought that it was a good pairing.”

When it comes to the pandemic, straight answers are hard to come by and it’s difficult to project what’s to come.

What is in view, however, are those who are dedicating their energy to bring back the fun-filled, activity based, naturally interactive education we all remember.

“Being able to step up and help students to make sure that we can have spring sports, that we can have in-person graduation and maybe have a prom,” says Ecoffey. “All those things go a long way for building better relationships. We love to step forward as much as we can.”

Where there are no guarantees to what the future holds.

“It’s a big deal for our students, and it bodes well for us. We’ll look at what kinds of changes will be coming,” says Urban.

There is always hope.

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